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A fundamental (often neglected) lecture skill: presenting with credibility

Author: Ana Gabriela Palis, MD.
Ann Eye Sci 2017; 2:38.

Being credible as medical speakers is a fundamental quality to achieve. Although there are many factors that determine the credibility of a medical presenter, the way presentations are delivered (the lecture’s structure, visual aids, and the lecturer’s communication skills and engagement with the audience) will influence the effect speakers have on their audience and how credible people consider the lecturer, which will ultimately affect students’ learning. This perspective provides recommendations to increase speakers’ credibility through applying common presentation and communication principles in four domains: expertise and competence (e.g., know your audience, organize your presentation, introduce yourself, hold your arguments with evidence, avoid information overload, be prepared to answer questions), authenticity (be an accessible and honest speaker), personal presence (rehearse your presentation, get organized early, enjoy the moment), and dynamism (engage your audience, do not read your slides, explain the data, use images rather than text, avoid distracting your audience, ask and encourage questions).

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

The good doctor: more than medical knowledge and surgical skill

Authors: Andreas K. Lauer, Dariah A. Lauer.
Annals of Eye Science, July 2017. doi: 10.21037/aes.2017.05.04.

In this Editorial, authors explain the whole spectrum of medical competencies as defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Education, and other attributes (open-mindedness, empathy, compassion, calmness, attentiveness, adaptability, self-improvement, passion, confidence, and humility) that, in addition to strong medical knowledge and outstanding surgical skills are essential to becoming a good doctor.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

Operating Room Performance Improves after Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Cataract Surgery Training

Authors: Ann Sofia Skou Thomsen, Daniella Bach-Holm, Hadi Kjaerbo, Klavs Hojgaard Olsen, Yousif Subhi, George Saleh, Yoon Soo Park, Morten la Cour, Lars Konge.
Ophthalmology 2017; 124(4):524-31.

Authors’ main purpose for this study was to investigate the effect of virtual reality proficiency-based training on cataract surgery performance. Their secondary objective was to define which surgeons benefit from virtual reality training. Through a multicenter masked clinical trial, eighteen cataract surgeons with different levels of experience received training in cataract surgery on a virtual simulator (EyeSi) until a proficiency-based test was passed. Results showed that non-independently operating surgeons and surgeons having performed fewer than 75 independent cataract surgeries showed significant improvements in the operating room, while more experienced cataract surgeons did not benefit from simulation.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

An evidence-based approach to surgical teaching in ophthalmology.

Authors: Alice C. Lorch, Carolin E. Kloek
Surv Ophthalmol 2017; 62(3):371-7.

In this article authors delineate a program of preprocedural, intraprocedural, and postprocedural teaching of ophthalmic surgery to maximize resident’s skill acquisition in a constructive learning environment.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

How to Become an Authentic Speaker

Author: Nick Morgan
Harvard Business Review 2008;86(11):115-9.

Communication expert Nick Morgan describes four aims to meet when rehearsing a presentation: 1) Being open to your audience 2) Connecting with your audience 3) Being passionate about your topic 4) Listening to your audience. He provides useful and practical examples to work on all of these areas.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

The Reliability, Validity, and Feasibility of Multisource Feedback Physician Assessment: A Systematic Review

Authors: Tyrone Donnon, Ahmed Al Ansari, Samah Al Alawi, and Claudio Violato.

In this systematic review the authors analyze 43 articles to investigate the reliability, generlizability, validity, and feasibility of 360-degree evaluations for the assessment of physicians.

They found out that this kind of assessment is an effective method for providing feedback to physicians about their clinical and nonclinical (professionalism, interpersonal skills, management) performance.

They conclude that the use of multisource feedback by peers, coworkers, and patients to assess physicians has high reliability, validity, and feasibility.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

Twelve tips for addressing medical student and resident physician lapses in professionalism

Authors: Steven Rougas, Bethany Gentilesco, Emily Green, Libertad Flore
Medical Teacher 2016; 37(10):901-7

This article reviews the literature related to addressing unprofessional behavior among trainees in medicine and provides a framework to provide practical guidance and empowerment for educators responsible for addressing medical student and resident physician lapses in professionalism.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/0142159X.2014.1001730

What do I do? Developing a competency inventory for postgraduate (residency) program directors.

Authors: Susan J. Lieff, Ari Zaretsky, Glen Bandiera, Kevin Imrie, Salvatore Spadafora, Susan Glover Takahashi
Medical Teacher 2016; 38(10):1011-6

In this articles the authors publish a Postgraduate Program Director Competency Inventory in order to frame the performance of program directors for a multisource feedback program and improve effective leadership of postgraduate programs. They included five domains of leadership competence: communication and relationship management, leadership, professionalism and self-management, environmental engagement, and management skills and knowledge.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

Twelve tips for postgraduate or undergraduate medics building a basic microsurgery simulation training course

Authors: Katrina A. Mason, Evgenia Theodorakopoulou, Georgios Pafitanis, Ali M. Ghanem, Simon R. Mayers
Medical Teacher 2016; 38(9):872-8

In this article authors provide a series of practical recommendations for setting up and run a basic ex-vivo microsurgery simulation training course:

  1. Attend other basic micro-surgery courses to gain experience from a student’s perspective
  2. Choose an appropriate course structure and length
  3. Choose an appropriate microsurgical simulation model
  4. Be realistic regarding course costs and course fees
  5. Consider audio-visual facilities and recording to enhance learning
  6. Tutors should have sufficient experience, and ideally be experts in the field, with a tutor:student ratio of 1:4
  7. Establish a partnership with a University or Hospital
  8. Assess student progression using objective global rating scales
  9. Engage senior micro-surgeons to teach on the course
  10. Seek Continuing Professional Development accreditation
  11. Use social media and surgical societies to promote and market your course
  12. Collect student and tutor feedback to ensure quality assurance for your course.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).

The good student is more than a listener – The 12+1 roles of the medical student

Authors: D. E. Karakitsiou, A. Markou, P. Kyriakou, M. Pieri, M. Abuaita, E. Bourousis, T. Hido, A. Tsatsaragkou, A. Boukali, C. de Burbure and I. D. K. Dimoliatis
Med Teach 2012; 34:e1-e8

Authors designed 12+1 roles of the good medical student to complement Harden’s 12 roles of the teacher and grouped them into six areas:

  1. Information receiver, in lectures and clinical context;
  2. Role model in learning and in class;
  3. Teaching facilitator and teacher’s mentor;
  4. Teacher’s assessor and curriculum evaluator
  5. Active participator and keeping up with curriculum
  6. Resource consumer and co-creator and medical literature researcher.

Although described for medical students, many of these principles can be applied by students at any level.

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* I have no financial interest to disclose (GP).